Research in the Sander group is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation and function of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, which are affected in diabetes. Our laboratory aims to identify strategies for beta cell regeneration and replacement in order to develop novel treatments for diabetes.

To understand cellular processes leading to diabetes, we employ genetic human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-based and mouse models. We interrogate these models with massively parallel sequencing and bioinformatic approaches and use functional assays to link molecular phenotypes to cell function and whole body physiology.

Our research is multi-disciplinary and highly collaborative. As part of the NIH-funded Human Islet Research Network (HIRN) we are generating a 3D islet organoid on a Chip and as part of the NIH-funded T2D-GENES Consortium we are using hPSC models to establish how genetic risk for diabetes causes cellular phenotypes.

We are looking for a postdoctoral researcher/senior scientist for integrative analysis of single cell data.

Dr. Maike Sander receives the Humboldt Research Award

@msanderlab

- April 14, 2021

Work from @1jorgeferrer @IldemAkerman models neonatal diabetes-associated insulin promoter mutation in a mouse model by swapping mouse for human insulin regulatory region. https://t.co/sm15M0rsP7
h J R
@msanderlab

- April 11, 2021

@LabSpagnoli: What a beautiful paper from Elowitz and Lois labs: intMEMOIR will facilitate the creation of cell atlases integrating lineage with spatial information and molecular profiles. https://t.co/8e07l0IaKi
h J R
@msanderlab

- April 9, 2021

@bcellorg @XiaoqingDai @JoanCamunas @LinfordBriant @Theo_d_S @JamesLyon9 @kjgaulton I am careful when it comes to equating TF expression to plasticity - just because a TF was expressed at an earlier developmental time point, it doesn't mean the TF renders an adult tissue cell plastic. Unfortunately, lots of inferences in literature without evidence.
h J R
@msanderlab

- April 9, 2021

@bcellorg @XiaoqingDai @JoanCamunas @LinfordBriant @Theo_d_S @JamesLyon9 @kjgaulton Might be Arx-high = highly functional = more susceptible to dysfunction in T2D. Clearly lots needs to be figured out there, but the patterns seem consistent between studies.
h J R